Antibiotics and aortic aneurysm

Certain antibiotics may cause aortic aneurysm. The US Food and Drug Administration recently warned healthcare providers that the benefits of fluoroquinolone antibiotics do not outweigh the risks—which include aortic aneurysm—for certain patients, according to the latest research. The research is based on reports of patient problems and on studies published between 2015 and 2018.

Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are often used to treat serious respiratory infections, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and even plague and exposure to anthrax. They include drugs sold under the names ciprofloxacin (Cipro), gemifloxacin (Factive), levofloxacin (Levaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), norfloxacin (Noroxin) and ofloxacin (Floxin). Patients may take them orally or through injection.

The drugs may cause aortic aneurysm, a bulge in an artery that can grow and burst, causing dangerous or fatal bleeding. Patients most at risk for an aortic aneurysm after taking these antibiotics are the elderly, those with high blood pressure, people who have a history of blockages of the aorta or other blood vessels, and those who have genetic conditions like Marfan syndrome or EhlersDanlos syndrome.
Although the risk of aortic aneurysm or dissection is low, researchers say patients are twice as likely to experience an aortic aneurysm or dissection when prescribed a fluoroquinolone drug. Patients who are known to be at risk of an aortic aneurysm, the benefits may not outweigh this risk, and alternative treatment should be considered.
For patients who don’t fall into a risk category, fluoroquinolones may still be a good option. They have been helping patients with bacterial infections for more than 30 years.

The FDA is requiring that a warning about these risks be added to prescribing information and to patient medication guides. Tthe agency has also warned that these drugs may significantly decrease blood sugar and negatively impact mental health and that the drugs may have a disabling side effect on muscles, nerves, joints and the central nervous system and should be restricted for use in some simpler infections.

If you are in one of these at risk categories and are taking one of these antibiotics, experts recommend talking to your doctor about it but continuing to take the medication.

Antibiotic Overuse

As soon as we get the sniffles, sore throat or a drippy nose the first thing many of us do is reach for an antibiotic. They’re usually readily available in our medicine cabinets. They are available because they are over-prescribed by doctors and emergency rooms everywhere and all the time.

47,000,000 prescriptions in the U.S. are unnecessarily prescribed causing efforts to improving the way we take and the way physicians prescribe antibiotics to become a national priority.

This article from the Centers for Disease Control outlines the dangers of overuse of antibiotics. Surprisingly at least 23,000 people a year die from antibiotic misuse.

The article points out when antibiotics should be taken and when they are needed. It also tells us when they shouldn’t be taken and when they are NOT needed. It also recommends alternatives that you can use (and things you can do) to feel better. While antibiotics can be very effective when prescribed and taken properly, they can also cause physical problems like reductions in good bacteria and immunity to the antibiotics themselves.

Of course, the best way to fight disease is to stay healthy in the first place. A good diet, plenty of water and moderate to vigorous exercise are good lifestyle choices to avoid the onset of disease. A pure and effective vitamin regime can also be effective. Be sure that you research the supplements that you choose and make sure that there are studies that support your choice.

Centers for Disease Control  article

Do you need an antibiotic?

With the onset of the fall season, we know that cold and flu season will soon be upon us. Unfortunately, not all of us are immune from the latest strains and, as soon as we get the sniffles, a sore throat or a drippy nose, the first thing many of us do is reach for an antibiotic. They’re usually readily available in our medicine cabinets. 

Did you know that 47,000,000 prescriptions in the U.S. are unnecessarily prescribed?

Antibiotics are often over-prescribed by doctors and emergency rooms. They may save lives, but any time antibiotics are used, there’s a chance they can lead to antibiotic resistance, not to mention the side effects they can cause. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control warns of the dangers of antibiotic overuse. Each year in the United States, at least 2 million people get infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and at least 23,000 people die as a result of this resistance.

Antibiotics won’t help common bacterial infections including most cases of bronchitis, many sinus infections, and some ear infections. Nor will it make you feel better if you have a virus. Antibiotics do not work on viral infections, colds, flu, or runny noses, even if the mucus is yucky, thick, yellow or green.

Antibiotics do save lives, and when a patient needs antibiotics, the benefits outweigh the risk of side effects. While antibiotics can be very effective when prescribed and taken properly, they can also cause physical problems like reductions in good bacteria and immunity to the antibiotics themselves. Common side effects of antibiotics can include: rash, dizziness, nausea, diarrhea, and yeast infections.

Talk with your healthcare professional about the best treatment for your or your loved one’s illness. If you need antibiotics, take them exactly as prescribed. Contact your healthcare professional if you have any questions about your antibiotics, or if you develop any side effects, especially diarrhea, since that could be a C. difficile infection, which needs to be treated immediately.

Respiratory viruses usually go away in a week or two without treatment. Ask your healthcare professional about the best way to feel better while your body fights off the virus.

Of course, the best way to fight disease is to stay healthy in the first place. A good diet, plenty of water and moderate to vigorous exercise are good lifestyle choices that help avoid the onset of disease.  

To stay healthy and keep others healthy:

  • Clean your hands.
  • Cover coughs.
  • Stay home when sick.
  • Get recommended vaccines (flu shot, for example).

A pure and effective vitamin regimen along with an immune support product (like the Activate-C Immune Complex I take) can also be effective. Be sure that you research the supplements you choose and make sure there are studies that support your choice.

Sources: https://www.cdc.gov/antibiotic-use/index.html