Essential Oils and the common cold

Did you remember to buy Oregano to help combat the cold & flu this year?

If you did, we can offer a few ways to use the oil to help you feel better. 1. Steam Inhalation:
Add two drops of oregano oil to a bowl of boiling water, place a towel over your head and breathe in the powerful vapors for five to ten minutes. The moist steam helps to loosen and drain mucus in the nasal passages and the antibacterial properties of the oil help to fight infections and relieve cold symptoms.

2. Use in a diffuser:
I love my diffuser, in fact there is one in almost every room. I add several drops of oregano oil to your diffuser (I like to use ten or twelve) and breathe in the medicinal vapors. It’s great for cold and flu season.

3. Inhale directly:
Feeling stuffy at work? A deep sniff of oregano oil directly from the bottle is a great pick-me-up and can help open up the airways.

4. Sore throat:
Add a few drops of oregano oil to a glass of warm water and gargle with the blend. The antibacterial properties of the oil will help to ward off bacteria and the anti-inflammatory properties will help to soothe an aching throat. Make certain not to swallow the oil mixture. Oregano essential oil is extremely potent and therefore should always be diluted before applying directly to the skin. Do not use internally is not considered safe for women to use during pregnancy, however consuming fresh oregano in leaf form, or as a dried spice while cooking, is okay.
Make a Healing rub: Add five to eight drops of oregano oil to one or two teaspoons of coconut oil (which is solid at room temperature) and rub on the chest as a soothing balm for respiratory tract infections and coughs. You can also rub this balm on the soles of the feet for added benefit.

Not only can oregano help with colds and flu, it can also help with wart removal.It’s best to apply oregano oil with a carrier oil topically: Mix three to four drops of oregano essential oil with one teaspoon of a carrier oil. Apply the blend with a clean cotton swab four to five times a day and make sure to use a clean swab if you are treating more than one wart so you don’t spread the infection. After treatment cover the wart with a tape or bandage so it is not fueled by oxygen. Within a week or two you should be able to notice a sizeable difference in the size of the wart.

Cold & flu season tips

It’s cold and flu season and there are so many things you can do to strengthen your immune system.

I haven’t had a major cold or flu in years. I attribute that to my move out of a mold infested house, a healthy lifestyle and my Peak Performance multi-vitamins. Lifestyle and taking care of yourself does make a difference.

Here is a simple guide to maintaining health throughout the cold and flu season.

Happy Wellness Wednesday!
#wellnesswednesday #keephealthy

Gin & Tonic Can Prevent Wintertime Colds?

We just read about a study that confirms Gin & Tonic can prevent wintertime colds. We know the Brits used Gin & Tonic to help prevent malaria in the tropics, this may be the next logical step for Gin & Tonic.

This awful winter rainy cold weather brings with it all of the symptoms of the common cold, including a runny nose, coughing, sore throat, and drowsiness. It is not something that we want, but it is something we have to endure during winter months.

If you enjoy feeling healthy and avoiding colds, there may be a solution hiding in plain sight. Many tend to reach for an antioxidant or superfood to cure a cold because of the high levels of vitamin C. It certainly can help to keep the cold away, but there may be something else you can do and it is a lot more fun! Have you ever thought about drinking a gin & tonic to help with your cold?

Some people may do it to help themselves sleep when they are sick but gin may actually be the alcoholic beverage of choice for those who are suffering. When you compare it with red wine, whiskey, and other alcoholic beverages, it has lower levels of histamine and that means fewer allergy triggers. If you plan on having a drink this winter, then the British Asthma Association recommends trying gin.

The low level of histamine is all due to the distillation process. When gin is distilled, it results in a lower histamine level but it also provides other benefits. One of those benefits is low levels of sulfites, which is also something that can help to keep your cold in check. It is also something that asthmatics would appreciate.

It’s cold, flu and respiratory ailment season…

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants to alert you about a respiratory infection that can affect your children and in some cases, adults. As it gets colder, parents make sure family members add layers and bundle up so they don’t become ill, but the CDC is warning parents to watch out for Respiratory Syncytial Virus or ‘RSV.’

RSV can start out as looking like a common cold. It is a respiratory virus that usually causes mild, cold-like symptoms and most people recover in a week or two. But RSV can also be serious, especially for infants and older adults.

In fact, RSV is the most common cause of bronchiolitis (inflammation of the small airways in the lung) and pneumonia (infection of the lungs) in children younger than one year of age in the United States. It is also a significant cause of respiratory illness in older adults. Right now, the CDC says there is not a vaccine available to treat RSV. There is a medicine that can help protect some babies. This medicine (called palivizumab) is a series of monthly shots.

Know the Symptoms: Fever; Reduced appetite; Runny nose; Cough; Wheezing

Help Prevent the Spread of RSV:

Wash your hands often.
Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, and help young children do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Washing your hands will help protect you from germs. Keep your hands off your face. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. Germs spread this way. I always keep my favorite hand sanitizer, Clear Sanitizer, with me because you never know when you will need protection from germs.

Avoid close contact with sick people. Avoid close contact, such as kissing, and sharing cups or eating utensils with people who have cold-like symptoms. Cover your coughs and sneezes. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or upper shirt sleeve when coughing or sneezing. Throw the tissue in the trash afterward and wash your hands.

Clean and disinfect surfaces. Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that people frequently touch, such as toys and doorknobs. When people infected with RSV touch surfaces and objects, they can leave behind germs. Also, when they cough or sneeze, droplets containing germs can land on surfaces and objects. An everyday cleaner doesn’t kill bacteria and viruses. That’s why my final step in any cleanup—and in between cleanups—is my favorite Sol-U-Guard Botanical disinfectant. It is all natural and no chemicals and it works on 99% of germs!
Stay home when you are sick. If possible, stay home from work, school, and public areas when you are sick. This will help protect others from catching your illness.

For more information on RSV, please click here.

Do you need an antibiotic?

With the onset of the fall season, we know that cold and flu season will soon be upon us. Unfortunately, not all of us are immune from the latest strains and, as soon as we get the sniffles, a sore throat or a drippy nose, the first thing many of us do is reach for an antibiotic. They’re usually readily available in our medicine cabinets. 

Did you know that 47,000,000 prescriptions in the U.S. are unnecessarily prescribed?

Antibiotics are often over-prescribed by doctors and emergency rooms. They may save lives, but any time antibiotics are used, there’s a chance they can lead to antibiotic resistance, not to mention the side effects they can cause. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control warns of the dangers of antibiotic overuse. Each year in the United States, at least 2 million people get infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and at least 23,000 people die as a result of this resistance.

Antibiotics won’t help common bacterial infections including most cases of bronchitis, many sinus infections, and some ear infections. Nor will it make you feel better if you have a virus. Antibiotics do not work on viral infections, colds, flu, or runny noses, even if the mucus is yucky, thick, yellow or green.

Antibiotics do save lives, and when a patient needs antibiotics, the benefits outweigh the risk of side effects. While antibiotics can be very effective when prescribed and taken properly, they can also cause physical problems like reductions in good bacteria and immunity to the antibiotics themselves. Common side effects of antibiotics can include: rash, dizziness, nausea, diarrhea, and yeast infections.

Talk with your healthcare professional about the best treatment for your or your loved one’s illness. If you need antibiotics, take them exactly as prescribed. Contact your healthcare professional if you have any questions about your antibiotics, or if you develop any side effects, especially diarrhea, since that could be a C. difficile infection, which needs to be treated immediately.

Respiratory viruses usually go away in a week or two without treatment. Ask your healthcare professional about the best way to feel better while your body fights off the virus.

Of course, the best way to fight disease is to stay healthy in the first place. A good diet, plenty of water and moderate to vigorous exercise are good lifestyle choices that help avoid the onset of disease.  

To stay healthy and keep others healthy:

  • Clean your hands.
  • Cover coughs.
  • Stay home when sick.
  • Get recommended vaccines (flu shot, for example).

A pure and effective vitamin regimen along with an immune support product (like the Activate-C Immune Complex I take) can also be effective. Be sure that you research the supplements you choose and make sure there are studies that support your choice.

Sources: https://www.cdc.gov/antibiotic-use/index.html