Anyone taking Elderberry?

Cold and Flu season is upon us and many are looking for natural ways to boost their immune system and prevent flu. Elderberry is an “old wives” tried and true remedy and it does help to boost the immune system.

I have found two products that have been working for me and find them so much better than Elderberry. The first is ProvexCV. It’s a small capsule proven to have highest absorption rate in the country. I take it daily. It has a lot to offer the immune system with the protective power of 10,000 purple grapes in every bottle, blood pressure benefits for healthy individuals are only the beginning! ProvexCV delivers a powerful and diverse dose of polyphenols for unparalleled antioxidant protection, optimal cardiovascular health, and a healthy immune response

The second product is Activate-C Immune Complex.It’s a proprietary blend of vitamins A, C, and D, zinc powered by Oligo®, plus quercetin and beta-glucan to optimize cellular response, helping the immune systems work harder and faster.

It comes in tablet form and a drink mix in two flavors, raspberry and orange. I like the drink version. The orange one reminds me of Tang that I used to drink as a kid. When it’s cold out I like to drink it warm. It’s comforting and makes me feel better instantly. I know this is one product that keeps my immune system operating at its peak with this blend of clinically proven ingredients.

Consider the value of prevention starting today. Make sure to stock up on immune boosting products that work! 

The exact timing and duration of flu seasons varies, but flu activity often begins to increase in October. Most of the time flu activity peaks between December and February, although significant activity can last as late as May Are you ready for a cold and flu season ?

Screen time and the brain

The first long-term study on how screen time affects children’s brains suggests more than two hours a day could do damage

A new and ongoing study from the National Institutes of Health is testing how screen time affects children’s brains, CBS News reported. When complete, the study will have followed more than 11,000 children for a decade, monitoring how digital screens like smartphones, video games, and tablets are changing the young brain. The first brain scans from the study have been analyzed, and researchers have concluded that children who spend more than seven hours a day on screens experience “premature thinning of the cortex,” Gaya Dowling, one of the study’s authors, said in an interview with “60 Minutes.” The study also found that children who have more than two hours of screen time a day got lower scores on tests focused on thinking and language skills.

A first-of-its-kind study from the National Institutes of Health is analyzing how screen time affects children’s brains, CBS News reported. Over the next decade, the study will follow children, who are currently 9 to 10 years old, as they grow up around screens. “We’ll be able to see not only how much time are they spending, how they perceive it impacting them, but also what are some of the outcomes,” Gaya Dowling, one of the study’s authors, said in an interview with “60 Minutes.” “And that will get at the question of whether there’s addiction or not.”

The first findings from the study show as little as two hours of screen time can be detrimental In fact, the study found that children who have more than two hours of screen time a day got lower scores on tests focused on thinking and language skills.

According to Dr. Dimitri Christakis, the lead author of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ most recent screen-time guidelines, these negative effects occur because children don’t know how to translate two-dimensional skills learned on a screen to the real, three-dimensional world. “If you give a child an app where they play with virtual Legos, virtual blocks, and stack them, and then put real blocks in front of them, they start all over,” he said on “60 Minutes.”

The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests toddlers stay away from screens as much as possible The newest screen-time guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics stress the importance of face-to-face communication and suggest parents avoid screen time for toddlers between the ages of 18 and 24 months, with the exception of video calling. The guidelines also suggest parents accompany young children whenever they are using screens. “Co-viewing is best when possible and for young children they learn best when they are re-taught in the real world what they just learned through a screen,” the guidelines noted.

The NIH study could help solidify guidelines about screen time for young people As the NIH study continues, researchers hope to retrieve information that can better inform screen-related health guidelines. As Dowling noted, a full picture of the screen-time effects won’t be possible until years down the line, when the study is complete. The NIH, has, however, finished enrolling the 11,000 children participating in the research project.

Product Recall

Have you seen all the recalls of personal care products, cleaning products ?
The Last call I saw was for a Clorox company product, Pine-Sol. If you are a Pine-Sol user,
it might be time to switch products and stores.  

Did you know you could buy many of the same types of products that you buy from the “Big Box” stores from an online AMERICAN MADE store? An American company that makes all of their products in their own manufacturing plants right here in the USA.

If you care about the products you use and want t know more contact me..

https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2023/Clorox-Recalls-Pine-Sol-Scented-Multi-Surface-Cleaners-CloroxPro-Pine-Sol-All-Purpose-Cleaners-and-Clorox-ProfessionalTM-Pine-Sol-Lemon-Fresh-Cleaners-Due-to-Risk-of-Exposure-to-Bacteria-1

Here a a few incentives to switch:
• The quality is great and the products easily compete with Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods.
• Products are affordable and priced competitively with Target and Walmart.
• There are more than 500 Products that are better and safer for you, your kiddos and pets from which to
choose. PLUS, they are made FRESH every month.
• Like Amazon, the products are shipped directly to your home.
• PRICES WILL NOT GO up constantly due to inflation like the other stores. 
• This company’s products are 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed 

I said YES to switching 19 years ago and it has been the best decision ever, especially now with supplier chain issues, shipping issues and inflation. 

Sleep deprivation can kill you

About a third of US adults don’t get enough sleep; I know I don’t — yet sleep deprivation has serious consequences for both your brain and body. Many people think they can get by on less sleep doctor than recommended — seven to nine hours a night — or say they need to sleep less because of work or family obligations.

Neuroscientist and sleep expert , Matthew Walker says “The shorter your sleep, the shorter your life.” Most adults need seven to nine hours of sleep, and kids need more, though needs do vary from person to person. There are some incredibly rare people can actually get by on a few hours of sleep per night, while others on the opposite end of the spectrum—the “long sleepers” need 11 hours nightly.

Regardless of your body’s clock, a lack of sleep will cause physical and mental health to suffer.
Sleep deprivation and disrupted sleep have been linked to a higher risk for certain cancers, most notably colon and breast cancers. Poor sleep quality strongly correlates with chronic skin problems, according to research from the University of Wisconsin. Studies have also found that when skin is damaged by the sun or other factors, it doesn’t heal as well when you are tired, leading to skin aging.

Researchers have found that sleep-deprived adults are less likely to connect socially, and those who report poor sleep also tend to say they’re lonelier. To make things worse, people who feel lonely don’t tend to sleep as well, which can lead to a sort of vicious cycle. Tired people have a harder time with impulse control. Those who don’t get enough sleep have more cravings for unhealthy meals and a harder time resisting high-calorie foods. Researchers think hormonal imbalances that result from sleep deprivation are responsible for this, since those imbalances are linked to a high body-mass index and obesity.

Being sleepy makes it harder to learn and disrupts short-term memory for both children and adults. Sleepiness has long been a problem for students. Delaying school start times an hour for middle-school kids has been found to significantly increase standardized test scores, and it may have an even bigger effect on teens, who naturally tend to be night owls. Several studies have found that sleep-deprived adults have more difficulty remembering words they’ve learned and have a harder time improving newly learned skills. Long-term sleep deprivation also seems to damage long-term memory.

Sleep-related memory deficits have been observed in the general adult population as well — as early as 1924, researchers noticed that people who slept more forgot less. Sleep disruptions for elderly people can lead to structural changes in the brain associated with impaired long-term memory. A growing body of evidence links bad sleep with signs of Alzheimer’s in the brain. Several NIH studies have found that sleep helps cleanse the brain of the beta-amyloid protein that can build up while you are awake. That protein is strongly associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers say that a lack of sleep can lead to a vicious cycle, since the more beta-amyloid protein there is in the brain, the harder it is to get to a cleansing deep-sleep state. People with more disrupted sleep schedules tend to have more beta-amyloid protein built up.

There’s plenty of evidence that sleep deprivation has a negative effect on the heart. When researchers kept people awake for 88 hours, their blood pressure went up. Even participants who were allowed to sleep for four hours a night showed an elevated heart rate when compared with those who got eight hours. Concentrations of C-reactive protein, a marker of heart-disease risk, also increase in people who are fully or partially deprived of sleep.

People become irritable after sleepless nights and research has found individuals become more distressed by common circumstances or work interruptions when tired. The longer people go without sleep, the harder it is for them to think clearly — others experience hallucinations when sleep-deprived. The longer a person stays awake, the more visual errors are encountered, including hallucinations.

Reaction time is severely impeded with lack of sleep. Studies have found that college athletes and West Point cadets all did worse on decision-making tests and had slower reactions while tired. So it’s no surprise that sleepiness makes people clumsier. Most people notice that when they’re sleepy, they’re not at the top of their game. One study found that one sleepless night contributed to a 20-32% increase in the number of errors made by surgeons. People playing sports that require precision— like shooting, sailing, or cycling — also make more mistakes when they’ve been awake for extended periods.

Prolonged sleep deprivation or one night of sleeplessness can impede your body’s natural defenses against infection. Sleep deprivation seems to make newly received vaccines less effective. Similarly, overtired people are more susceptible to colds. If you’re wondering why you’re sick all the time and seem to pick up every bug that travels around the office, it’s probably because you’re not getting enough sleep. Sleep-deprived people are three times as likely as well-rested people to catch a cold, according to one study.

Sleeping increases testosterone levels, while being awake decreases them. Testosterone is an important component of sexual drive and desire in both women and men. Sleep deprivation and disturbed sleep, consequently, are associated with reduced libido and sexual dysfunction. People with sleep apnea are particularly at risk.

Sleepy people express more unhappiness and signs of depression In a classic study led by the Nobel Prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman, a group of 909 working women kept detailed logs of their moods and day-to-day activities. While differences in income up to $60,000 had little effect on happiness, the results found, a poor night’s sleep was one of two factors that could ruin the following day’s mood. (The other was tight deadlines at work.) Another study reported higher marital happiness among women with more peaceful sleep, though it’s hard to say whether happy people sleep better, or good sleep makes people happier. Most likely, it’s some combination of the two. Insomniacs are also twice as likely to develop depression, and research suggests that treating sleep problems may help treat depressive symptoms. Risk of type 2 diabetes rises when people are overtired, even for people who aren’t overweight Being awake when your body wants you to be asleep messes with your metabolism, which in turn increases your risk for insulin resistance (often called “prediabetes”) and type 2 diabetes. Several studies in adults have found a strong association — though not a cause-effect relationship — between regular sleep loss and the risk of developing diabetes. More sleep may also help reduce diabetes risk for adolescents, according to researchers. Tiredness is associated with bad decision-making that can put lives and finances in danger Planning to make some changes to your portfolio? You might want to make sure you’re well-rested. “A single night of sleep deprivation evoked a strategy shift during risky decision making such that healthy human volunteers moved from defending against losses to seeking increased gains,” researchers said. Other researchers have found that severe sleep deprivation impairs people’s ability to follow preestablished procedures for making a “go” or “no-go” decision, something that researchers say contributed to the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger, the Chernobyl meltdown, and the Exxon Valdez disaster. Sleepy people are more easily distracted “Attention tasks appear to be particularly sensitive to sleep loss,” researchers noted. If you want to stay alert and attentive, sleep is a requirement. Otherwise, you enter “an unstable state that fluctuates within seconds and that cannot be characterized as either fully awake or asleep,” researchers said. In that state, your ability to pay attention is variable at best. Tiredness makes it hard to speak normally Severe sleep deprivation seems to affect your ability to carry on a conversation— much like having too much to drink. “Volunteers kept awake for 36 hours showed a tendency to use word repetitions and clichés; they spoke monotonously, slowly, and indistinctly,” one study noted. “They were not able to properly express and verbalize their thoughts.” Like driving drunk, driving tired can lead to more car accidents Drowsy driving is often compared to drunk driving: You really shouldn’t do either. “Motor vehicle accidents related to fatigue, drowsy driving, and falling asleep at the wheel are particularly common, but often underestimated,” one review concluded. Pilots, truck drivers, medical residents, and others required to stay awake for long periods “show an increased risk of crashes or near misses due to sleep deprivation,” it said. Tiredness is connected to urine overproduction When people sleep, the body slows down its normal urine production. But when someone is sleep-deprived, that doesn’t happen, leading to what researchers call “excess nocturnal urine production.” This condition may be linked to bed-wetting in children. In adults, it’s tied to what’s called nocturia, the need to use the bathroom many times during the night. You need sleep for muscles to get stronger — without it, muscle atrophy occurs Lack of sleep causes hormonal changes that make it harder for your body to build muscle and heal. This makes it more difficult to recover from muscle damage caused by exercise, and it worsens conditions related to muscle atrophy. Other research has found that the reverse is also true — that during sleep, your body releases growth hormone and heals damage. That’s why fitness advocates will always point out that sleep is an essential part of getting in shape. Sleepiness makes pain harder to cope with People in pain — especially those who have chronic pain — tend to not get enough sleep. This makes sense, since pain can wake you up in the night and make it hard to fall asleep in the first place. But recently, researchers have begun to suspect that sleep deprivation may actually cause pain or at least increase people’s sensitivity to pain. Tiredness leads to gastrointestinal issues Regular sleep loss makes you more likely to develop both inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, which affects an estimated 10-15% of people in North America. Patients with Crohn’s disease have been found to be twice as likely to experience a relapse when they don’t get enough sleep. Sleepiness is associated with headaches Scientists don’t yet know exactly why sleep deprivation leads to headaches, but it’s a connection doctors have noticed for more than a century. Migraines can be triggered by sleepless nights, and one study found that 36-58% of people with sleep apnea reported waking up with “nondescript morning headaches.” Disrupted sleep cycles lead to more inflammation, which could worsen asthma, arthritis, and cardiovascular disease Our sleep cycle or body clock doesn’t just determine when we’re tired or awake — it also affects the function of every cell in our body. Researchers have started to figure out how disruptions in sleep schedules prevent cells from fighting inflammation, which could explain why tired people often have many problems from inflammatory conditions, including asthma, arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. If snoring or sleep apnea is causing sleep disruption, it could lead to serious health problems Snoring can be an indication that you are dealing with sleep apnea, a sleep disorder that can cause other medical problems over time. It’s caused by decreased airflow, which can strain the heart and cause cardiovascular problems. The condition is also linked to weight gain. Poor sleep disrupts genetic activity, which may explain some of the health risks of getting too little rest A 2013 study shed some light on why sleep is tied to so many different aspects of our health and wellness: Poor sleep actually disrupts normal genetic activity. Researchers found that among study participants who slept less than six hours a night for a week, more than 700 of their genes were not behaving normally, including some that help govern immune and stress responses. Some genes that typically cycle according to a daily (circadian) pattern stopped doing so, while others that don’t normally follow a daily pattern began to do that. What does this mean? Just one week of less-than-ideal sleep is enough to make some of your genetic activity go haywire. At any given time, people who haven’t gotten the right amount of sleep are more likely to die Many health problems are associated with sleep deprivation and poor sleep, but here’s the big one: People who consistently do not get seven or eight hours of sleep a night are more likely to die during a given period. Put more simply: We all die eventually, but sleeping too little— or even too much— is associated with a higher risk of dying sooner than you might otherwise. Lauren Friedman wrote an earlier version of this story.

Blood Sugar and Insulin

Last year, I found myself waking up in the ICU of a hospital, with no memory of how I got there. My last memory is that I was at the airport. I remember having a vague conversation with a police officer. Other than that, I have no further recollection of that day until I woke up in that ICU two days later. Luckily I carry my health info and medical cards with my drivers license, so they were able to care for me. The diagnosis? DKA – Diabetic Ketoacidosis. My blood sugars had spiked to nearly 600 and I was on the verge of a diabetic coma. Considering I had never had any indication of sugar issues — all my bloodwork always came back perfectly normal.

So what happened? My doctors explained that my recent move, my recently broken shoulder and the resulting pain and lack of sleep, burying a parent, extensive dental work and weight loss (a good thing) put quite a bit of stress. Turns out all of these contributed to a metabolic imbalance and my body decided to crash—big time.

Turns out the ability of the body to control insulin can make significant differences in the quality of one’s health. Insulin is a hormone that is generated in the pancreas. It is released, optimally, in small amounts throughout the day and in larger amounts after meals.

Insulin and its effects can also cause weight gain, battle metabolic issues and even lead to diabetes. The below article from “Get Your Lean On” gives me some insight and tips on controlling the insulin my body manufactures and I thought I’d share.

It recommends avoiding all forms of sugar, which led me to the R3 lifestyle. The  study results showed sugar promotes insulin resistance. Refined carbohydrates are another food to moderate or avoid completely, if you are able to, since they are converted to sugars. With my new eating plan, I rarely crave sweets or carb-loaded foods—but I still crave grapefruit and indulge that craving every other day.

The article also recommends eating foods that are higher in soluble fiber and will help stabilize and regulate blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber also produces higher levels of good “gut’ bacteria and makes you feel fuller, longer. I make certain I get lots of veggies and drink Fiberwise daily. I’m never hungry between meals anymore.

Of course, the study recommends that regular exercise should also be a part of a good daily, healthy regime. Unfortunately with my broken shoulder and subsequent shoulder replacement, I’ve not been working out or exercising for the past year—other than walking the dog, that is.

Finally,I’ve followed the suggestion to increase consumption of lean protein.  With R3 I make it a point to have protein within an hour of waking up each morning. I didn’t believe it when I was first told to do this, but it works! Turns out the protein helps to absorb valuable amino acids that build muscle. Eating the right proteins is critical to the overall effect of an insulin “smart” diet, so I pay attention to the types and amounts of the protein I eat.

You may also want to consider some supplementation in your plan, regardless if your goals are weight-loss or simply universal good health. My company has developed a great tasting shake in several different flavors that allow me to easily and conveniently control my blood sugar and insulin levels.

www.getyourleanon.com/blog_home/2016/08/13/5-ways-lower-blood-sugar-and-insulin-levels-naturally-get-your-lean/

Beating Winter’s Health Challenges

The Post- Holiday Season typically presents challenges to both our physical and emotional health. Whether it’s the rush of it all, overextending ourselves physically, Seasonal Affective Disorder from the short days, dealing with difficult relationships, financial stress, inclement weather, or a host of other issues, it can be a tough time.

I’m not an authority on this subject, but I have observed a number of things that can help keep you physically and emotionally healthy through this winter season.

PHYSICAL HEALTH CHALLENGES

There’s are fewer daylight and your skin is almost totally covered with clothing such that your natural vitamin D production is almost nil. Those short days also lend themselves to Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) which can not only depress your immune system, but also affect you emotionally. Your home and workplace is shut up against the cold, so you have a lack of fresh air and a greater exposure to disease-causing microorganisms. That closed environment also makes it easier for you to get infections from those around you.

Colder temperatures are also more stressful on your body, requiring greater adaptation to stay healthy. So what can you do:

1. Be sure to take at least 5000 i.u.’s of Vitamin D-3 daily — you may need 10,000, especially if you live in a non-sunny climate.
2. Get some fresh air in your home, even if that’s just opening some windows for a few minutes or leaving a window cracked in your bedroom at night.
3. If you are particularly bothered by the short days, consider getting one of the specially designed full-spectrum lights and expose yourself to it in the early morning and late afternoon.
4. Take other immune system stimulating supplements, such as L-Lysine, echinacea, IP6, etc.

I personally take Peak Performance Packs year round to help keep my siystem at optimal health. What do you take or do for the winter?

Dirty carpet?

.Our 23 year old carpet that had not been cleaned good for a while and it recently got a bit of chocolate shake spilled on it.

Before

After

Chemical free cleaners from my shopping club saved the day.

#ShopClubWin

A bit about my Shopping Club

I love my shopping club but did you know the number one question I get asked is if my Shopping Club’s products are more expensive or cost more? May answer is always NOPE. 

The dish soap is less than $4. The laundry detergent costs far less than Tide, and my other household cleaners that compete with 409, Windex and the like, are less than $1 per bottle and smell like botanical flowers

 As fo supplements, not only are the good, they are competitively priced. For example: Vitamin D3 is $7.49 for 120 tablets. I consider that a score! 

The company offers each new customer the “new customer cleaning pack”. This box of cleaning supplies costs less than $100 and comes with 30 different products , from windows cleaners to floor cleansers and bathroom cleaners to your laundry detergent. This box alone means 64 loads of laundry can be done at a cost of 18¢ per load. That’s some savings!

I’ve yet to find a single product in m nearly 20 years of being a customer that costs more than what I was paying before I switched stores.

This shopping club has: 
• Close to 500 products to choose from
• Walmart like pricing
• Whole Foods quality. 
• All products are eco-friendly and safe
• No price gouging.  
• No lines.
• No leaving the house. 
• No one has ever been harmed by these products in the company’s 35 years in business
• Products are so SAFE that Childproof caps NOT REQUIRED (that’s benefit for those with small children)

The best part?
EVERYTHING is delivered to my front door and I get free products every month I shop. Switching stores  20 years ago has been one of the best decisions I’ve ever made for me and my family. 

My R3 Journey

My R3 journey started around 2017. I wanted to lose weight feel and better about myself.
You see, I wasn’t always overweight or obese, I was always fit in spite of my asthma. To keep my lungs healthy, I worked out several days a week lifting weights. I did aerobics two to three times a week. I swam. I biked with the bike club two “short” rides and one long ride every week. I also rode my bike to work 19 miles each way practically every day. I was active and had a great social life.

Then, I gained a little weight, not much at first. After a major asthma attack which landed me in the ICU for several weeks, I gained “prednisone weight” about 20 pounds. I still participated in the Dublin Marathon three weeks after getting out of hospital. I was so full of Prednisone weight, I walked the marathon. (It took five and a half hours.)

Shortoly afterward i participated in an asthma drug study. During that study, I gained 70 pounds.

I had become fat. Not only that friends treated me differently as though I lacked will power or I was lazy. I wasn’t, but…

Around this time my dad went into a nursing home, since my mother did not drive,I became a driver for her and patient advocate while working 60-hour work weeks and volunteering for local charities. Although I was busy and on my feet all day and water running three days a week, I remained heavy.

At my heaviest, I was 250 pounds and often the heaviest person in the room. I hated it.

At this point, my dad passed, I was now my mothers caregiver, and my doctor suggested  human growth hormone injections to see if I could lose weight. His program started out promising, and combined with early morning workouts with a personal trainer, I lost 13 pounds in the first two weeks, but nothing after that. After 3 months we were stopped.

That brings me to that first R3 Challenge around 2017. I took the before picture and submitted it. I didn’t do all that well, but I did lose maybe 10 pounds
When comparing  the after picture with my before picture you could tell my clothing definitely ldid not look or fit the same. The same clothing is in both photos. If you look closely you’ll see my left arm is in the pants. Most of my work colleagues and friends thought I lost a lot of weight but I hadn’t. I’d lost inches. A Non-Scale Victory (NSV).

I semi-participated in other challenges after that, but never really finished them. My schedule was terrible, I was taking care of everyone and everything but myself. But I finally was just under 200 pounds thanks to swimming and rowing three times a week. It was progress.

In 2021 my mother passed away and I decided I needed to make life changes.
I changed jobs and put my house on the market. I took a trip to South Carolina to check out the housing market.

2022 arrived. For me, 2022 will forever be “Year of the Shoulder”. The year began with a good purchase offer on my home on January 6.  That same day, while at work, I tripped over a case of wine, fell and broke my right  shoulder (my dominant hand). My house was closing on January 25. I had 20 days to pack, find a new home and move—all with a freshly broken shoulder. I ended up purchasing a brand new house sight-unseen in Florida with a closing date of January 26 — a day after my New Jersey closing. I was lucky as I was also able to find a good mover to match my timeline. It was a very painful move but i made the 16-hour drive with my dog.

Once arriving in Florida, it was time to regroup. I found I moved to a new development in a town I had never heard of, but it was now home.Rain was coming down in buckets. The pain prevented a lot of unpacking (I still haven’t found all of my silverware).

Being on Worker’s Comp, I needed to find an orthopedic doctor in Florida who would accept the Worker’s Comp insurance to care for the shoulder. I finally got an appointment for an orthopedist on April 28. I weighed in at his office at 213.

I wasn’t happy. I went on a girls’ trip vacation wearing a sling and was once again the fattest person in the room. I was sick and tired of being overweight, unhappy and in pain. I had to do something.

When I saw the Challenge beginning June 6 – the same day I started Physical therapy — I joined. I figured I couldn’t work and unpacking the garage was still a tedious, painful, one-armed process. I couldn’t even find my scale in the garage, I had to buy a new one! Nor did I have a mirror.

I started the challenge.Some days were good, some weren’t. My physical therapy lasted the entire length of the challenge. I was in constant pain. When the challenge ended, I was down 25 pounds! I was surprised I lost the weight, since I wasn’t the best at sticking to the plan 100 percent.

The best part, I continued to lose weight (another 15 pounds) after the challenge just by following the Real Life part of R3. 

In August, after an 18-month wait, I flew to Washington, DC and Arlington National Cemetery to bury my mother. The flight home was an adventure. After multiple delays and a layover, I arrived at my destination airport, and I woke up two days later in a hospital ICU. Apparently, stress and the pain medication caused a cascade effect resulting in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). I also had never been a diabetic prior to this event, I have no memory of being in an ambulance, in an ER or let alone in an MRI, but I was. 

When I was released, to go home —my day trip to DC had turned into a week. I had gained 11 pounds (they said water weight from IVs). It took three weeks to lose the water weight following R3’s Real Life phase. The good news was the endocrinologist approved the R3 plan and liked the idea of my eating five to six times a day to keep my metabolism balanced. By September, my blood numbers were back to normal and I was taken off nearly all of the medications that came home with me from the hospital.

October came and I was down a total of 53 pounds. I decided not to do the Fall R3 challenge. I had a surgical date for a total reverse shoulder replacement on November 16—
I didn’t want hospital food ruining my challenge! Knowing I would be incapacitated for six weeks, I cooked R3-friendly meals—enough for 42 days and froze them tor my recovery meals. By the time of my surgery, I had lost an additional 14 pounds. This time, at the orthopedic office, I weighed in at 146 pounds! Fully Dressed. With shoes. 

Of course, after surgery, I swelled up and gained 30 pounds! I left the hospital weighing 176 pounds, It took a month to shed those 30 pounds of water weight. Again I did it by following my R3 Real Life phase

On December 31, I was 145 pounds.

I’m happy about the weight loss, especially since I wasn’t allowed any workouts other than walking my chihuahua. I admit I feel better about myself now that i’m closer to my ideal weight. My shoulder needs to finish healing, before I can go back to swimming, water running and rowing, to stay fit, but I’ll get there with R3. I want to lose the last 15-20 pounds for my ideal weight.

Today Im ready to start the January 2023 challenge on January 16. Who is ready to join me?

.

Brown Boxes

You may be wondering why I’m posting photos of these boxes? Well,it was 19 years ago that I decided to take a leap of faith for my health and my finances. These brown boxes arrive at my door every month. These boxes remind me that help others and in the process transform my own life. It also reminds me that II made the right decision. Love the products & Love the Company

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