Blood Sugar and Insulin

Last year, I found myself waking up in the ICU of a hospital, with no memory of how I got there. My last memory is that I was at the airport. I remember having a vague conversation with a police officer. Other than that, I have no further recollection of that day until I woke up in that ICU two days later. Luckily I carry my health info and medical cards with my drivers license, so they were able to care for me. The diagnosis? DKA – Diabetic Ketoacidosis. My blood sugars had spiked to nearly 600 and I was on the verge of a diabetic coma. Considering I had never had any indication of sugar issues — all my bloodwork always came back perfectly normal.

So what happened? My doctors explained that my recent move, my recently broken shoulder and the resulting pain and lack of sleep, burying a parent, extensive dental work and weight loss (a good thing) put quite a bit of stress. Turns out all of these contributed to a metabolic imbalance and my body decided to crash—big time.

Turns out the ability of the body to control insulin can make significant differences in the quality of one’s health. Insulin is a hormone that is generated in the pancreas. It is released, optimally, in small amounts throughout the day and in larger amounts after meals.

Insulin and its effects can also cause weight gain, battle metabolic issues and even lead to diabetes. The below article from “Get Your Lean On” gives me some insight and tips on controlling the insulin my body manufactures and I thought I’d share.

It recommends avoiding all forms of sugar, which led me to the R3 lifestyle. The  study results showed sugar promotes insulin resistance. Refined carbohydrates are another food to moderate or avoid completely, if you are able to, since they are converted to sugars. With my new eating plan, I rarely crave sweets or carb-loaded foods—but I still crave grapefruit and indulge that craving every other day.

The article also recommends eating foods that are higher in soluble fiber and will help stabilize and regulate blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber also produces higher levels of good “gut’ bacteria and makes you feel fuller, longer. I make certain I get lots of veggies and drink Fiberwise daily. I’m never hungry between meals anymore.

Of course, the study recommends that regular exercise should also be a part of a good daily, healthy regime. Unfortunately with my broken shoulder and subsequent shoulder replacement, I’ve not been working out or exercising for the past year—other than walking the dog, that is.

Finally,I’ve followed the suggestion to increase consumption of lean protein.  With R3 I make it a point to have protein within an hour of waking up each morning. I didn’t believe it when I was first told to do this, but it works! Turns out the protein helps to absorb valuable amino acids that build muscle. Eating the right proteins is critical to the overall effect of an insulin “smart” diet, so I pay attention to the types and amounts of the protein I eat.

You may also want to consider some supplementation in your plan, regardless if your goals are weight-loss or simply universal good health. My company has developed a great tasting shake in several different flavors that allow me to easily and conveniently control my blood sugar and insulin levels.

www.getyourleanon.com/blog_home/2016/08/13/5-ways-lower-blood-sugar-and-insulin-levels-naturally-get-your-lean/

Blood Sugar and Insulin

The ability of your body to control insulin can make significant differences in the quality of your health. Insulin is a hormone that is generated in your pancreas. It is released, optimally, in small amounts throughout the day and in larger amounts after meals.

Insulin and its effects can also cause you to gain weight, battle metabolic issues and even lead to diabetes. The below article from Get Your Lean On gives you some insight and tips on controlling the insulin your body manufactures.

Try to avoid all forms of sugar. There are study results referred to here that will give you some reasons why. In short, sugar promotes insulin resistance. Refined carbohydrates are another food to moderate or avoid completely, if you are able to, since they are converted to sugars.

The article also recommends eating foods that are higher in soluble fiber and will help stabilize and regulate blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber also produces higher levels of good “gut’ bacteria and makes you feel fuller, longer. Regular exercise should also be a part of your daily, healthy regime.

Finally, increase your consumption of lean protein. It helps to absorb valuable amino acids that build muscle. Eating the right proteins is critical to the overall effect of your insulin “smart” diet, so pay attention to the types and amounts of the protein you eat.

You may also want to consider some supplementation in your plan, regardless if your goals are weight-loss or simply universal good health. My company has developed a great tasting shake in several different flavors that allow me to easily and conveniently control my blood sugar and insulin levels.

www.getyourleanon.com/blog_home/2016/08/13/5-ways-lower-blood-sugar-and-insulin-levels-naturally-get-your-lean/

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