Do you have Metabolic Syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome is a group of five risk factors that increase the likelihood of developing heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. Lifestyle changes like losing weight, exercise, and dietary changes can help prevent or reverse metabolic syndrome.

The five risk factors are: increased blood pressure (greater than 130/85 mmHg); high blood sugar levels (insulin resistance); excess fat around the waist; high triglyceride levels and/or low levels of good cholesterol (HDL).

Having one of these risk factors does not mean that you have metabolic syndrome. However, having one will increase your chances of developing cardiovascular disease. Having three or more of these factors will result in a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome and it will increase your risk of health complications.

The American Heart Association (AHA) reports that 23 percent of adults currently have metabolic syndrome.

Did you know that there really are NO discernible symptoms for metabolic syndrome? Aside from a large waist circumference of greater than 40 inches in men, and greater than 35 inches in women, most of the disorders associated with metabolic syndrome have no symptoms.

To find out if you have (or are prone to) metabolic syndrome, your doctor will perform several different tests in addition to checking your waist circumference.

Your fasting blood triglycerides will be tested— is your level 150 milligrams per deciliter of blood (mg/dL) or greater?

You will be asked about your cholesterol levels. Is your HDL cholesterol less than 40 mg/dL (men) or less than 50 mg/dL (women)?

You will have your fasting glucose level checked. Is it 100 mg/dL or greater?

How is your blood pressure? Is your Systolic blood pressure (top number) 130 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or greater, or diastolic blood pressure (bottom number) of 85 mm Hg or greater?

If your answers are yes to any of three or more of tests, you may have metabolic syndrome.

So, if you’re having trouble losing weight, metabolic syndrome could be the reason why! When your body doesn’t produce enough insulin to convert glucose to energy for your cells, it gets stored as excess fat. Even though you may be eating LESS than your skinny friends!

If you think you may be one of the 25% of adults affected by this disorder, there are a few things you can do to reverse the symptoms if you have it and if you don’t have it you can prevent it from happening to you.

The first is increase your exercise. Find something you like doing and start slowly. It can be something as simple as taking your dog for a walk more often and gradually increasing distance, or parking further away from you destination’s entrance to increase the number of steps you take each day.

This next tip is always harder than it sounds: lose weight if you’re overweight. It will be easier to lose weight if you do increase your exercise.

Make certain to eat a healthy diet with lots of fruits and vegetables, lean protein, whole grains, and low fat dairy. Go easy on the saturated fats, trans fat, cholesterol, and salt—it will make a difference.

You can also add supplements to your diet. I personally added Peak Performance Metabolic Health Bundle to help provide metabolic support. This supplement pack works to slow my body’s absorption of sugar, inhibits the release of sugar in the bloodstream, and supports thermogenesis as well efficient calorie burning for healthy weight management. It seems to work for me—the weight loss and toning is quite noticeable!

Quit smoking if you smoke. Seriously, does any smoke anymore? It is just so bad for you!

Lastly, Schedule regular checkups with your healthcare provider to monitor and manage blood glucose, blood cholesterol, and blood pressure.

Download The American Heart Association’s printable Answers by Heart sheet: What is Metabolic Syndrome? (PDF)

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Choosing physical activities that match your needs

Choosing physical activities that match your fitness level and health goals can help you stay motivated and keep you from getting hurt. You may feel some minor discomfort or muscle soreness when you first become active. These feelings should go away as you get used to your activity. However, if you feel sick to your stomach or have pain, you may have done too much. Go easier and then slowly build up your activity level. Some activities, such as walking or water workouts, are less likely to cause injuries.

If you have been inactive, start slowly and see how you feel. Gradually increase how long and how often you are active. If you need guidance, check with a health care or certified fitness professional.

Here are some tips for staying safe during physical activity:

  • Wear the proper safety gear, such as a bike helmet if you are bicycling.
  • Make sure any sports equipment you use works and fits properly.
  • Look for safe places to be active. For instance, walk in well-lit areas where other people are around. Be active with a friend or group.
  • Stay hydrated to replace the body fluids you lose through sweating and to prevent you from getting overheated.
  • If you are active outdoors, protect yourself from the sun with sunscreen and a hat or protective visor and clothing.
  • Wear enough clothing to keep warm in cold or windy weather. Layers are best.

Stay hydrated to replace the body fluids you lose through sweating.

If you don’t feel right, stop your activity. If you have any of the following warning signs, stop and seek help right away:

  • pain, tightness, or pressure in your chest or neck, shoulder, or arm
  • extreme shortness of breath
  • dizziness or sickness

You can find many fun places to be active. Having more than one place may keep you from getting bored. Here are some options:

  • Join or take a class at a local fitness, recreation, or community center.
  • Enjoy the outdoors by taking a hike or going for a walk in a safe local park, neighborhood, or mall.
  • Work out in the comfort of your own home with a workout video or by finding a fitness channel on your TV, tablet, or other mobile device.

Tips for choosing a fitness center

  • Make sure the center has exercise equipment for people who weigh more and staff to show you how to use it.
  • Ask if the center has any special classes for people just starting out, older adults, or people with mobility or health issues.
  • See if you can try out the center or take a class before you join.
  • Try to find a center close to work or home. The quicker and easier the center is to get to, the better your chances of using it often.

Make sure you understand the rules for joining and ending your membership, what your membership fee covers, any related costs, and the days and hours of operation.

Check with a health care professional about what to do if you have any of these warning signs. If your activity is causing pain in your joints, feet, ankles, or legs, you also should consult a health care professional to see if you may need to change the type or amount of activity you are doing.

Staying active at any size

Physical activity may seem hard if you’re overweight. You may get short of breath or tired quickly. Finding or affording the right clothes and equipment may be frustrating. Or, perhaps you may not feel comfortable working out in front of others.

The good news is you can overcome these challenges. Not only can you be active at any size, you can have fun and feel good at the same time.

Research strongly shows that physical activity is safe for almost everyone. The health benefits of physical activity far outweigh the risks.1

If you have problems moving or staying steady on your feet, or if you get out of breath easily, talk with a health care professional before you start. You also should talk with a health care professional if you are unsure of your health, have any concerns that physical activity may be unsafe for you, or have:

Being active may help you live longer and protect you from developing serious health problems, such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and certain types of cancer. Regular physical activity is linked to many health benefits, such as:
• healthy bones, muscles, and joints
• lower blood pressure and blood glucose, or blood sugar
• a strong heart and lungs
• better sleep at night and improved mood

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition defines regular physical activity as a minimum of 150 minutes a week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, such as brisk walking. Brisk walking is a pace of three miles per hour or faster. A moderate-intensity activity makes you breathe harder but does not overwork or overheat you. You should also do muscle-strengthening activities at least two days a week.

You may reach this goal by starting with five minutes of physical activity several times a day, five to six days a week. You could then gradually work up to 10 minutes per session, three times a day. If you do even more activity, you may gain even more health benefits.1

When combined with healthy eating, regular physical activity may also help you control your weight. However, research shows that even if you can’t lose weight or maintain your weight loss, you still can enjoy important health benefits from regular physical activity.

Physical activity also can be a lot of fun if you do activities you enjoy and are active with other people. Being active with others may give you a chance to meet new people or spend more time with family and friends. You also may inspire and motivate one another to get and stay active.

Eating celery for 14 days can change your health

Celery is by far one of the most nutritious vegetables available. It is a great source of potassium, magnesium, and vitamins A, B, C, and K. It is also rich in phytonutrients, which act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents, boosting the immune system and overall health.

Fresh celery benefits nutrition thanks to all the tremendous vitamins and minerals it contains. One cup of chopped raw celery (about 101 grams) contains approximately:

  • 16.2 calories
  • 3.5 grams carbohydrates
  • 0.7 gram protein
  • 0.2 gram fat
  • 1.6 grams fiber
  • 29.6 micrograms vitamin K (37 percent DV)
  • 453 international units (9 percent DV)
  • 36.5 micrograms folate (9 percent DV)
  • 263 milligrams potassium (8 percent DV)
  • 3.1 milligrams vitamin C (5 percent DV)
  • 0.1 milligram manganese (5 percent DV)
  • 0.1 milligram vitamin B6 (4 percent DV)
  • 40.4 milligrams calcium (4 percent DV)
  • 0.1 milligram riboflavin (3 percent DV)
  • 11.1 milligrams magnesium (3 percent DV)

All with some sugars, celery also contains some vitamin E, niacin, pantothenic acid, iron, phosphorus, zinc, and selenium.

According to Healthy Food House, researchers have confirmed the numerous health benefits of celery:

  • Celery can help prevents chronic inflammation
  • It helps regulate the pH balance of the body
  • it assist in weight loss since it is low in calories but high in fiber
  • Celery helps digestion and treats stomach issues and constipation
  • It can help treat urinary tract infections as it has potent diuretic properties
  • It soothes the nervous system and may help you fall asleep
  • Celery has been found to regulate cholesterol and blood pressure, since it contains phthalide
  • It is low in acids and relieves heartburn and acid reflux
  • Celery is abundant in vitamin A, so it improves vision, treats dry eyes, and protects the cornea
  • It can clean your teeth like a natural dental floss since it is breaking into fibrous strands while chewing

You can appreciate the countless benefits of celery in many ways. It goes great in soups, stir-fries, stews, and salads. It can also be dipped in peanut butter, hummus, or other sauces.

If you found this information helpful or just have a love for celery, please remember to SHARE this article with your family and friends on Facebook!

Blood Sugar and Insulin

The ability of your body to control insulin can make significant differences in the quality of your health. Insulin is a hormone that is generated in your pancreas. It is released, optimally, in small amounts throughout the day and in larger amounts after meals.

Insulin and its effects can also cause you to gain weight, battle metabolic issues and even lead to diabetes. The below article from Get Your Lean On gives you some insight and tips on controlling the insulin your body manufactures.

Try to avoid all forms of sugar. There are study results referred to here that will give you some reasons why. In short, sugar promotes insulin resistance. Refined carbohydrates are another food to moderate or avoid completely, if you are able to, since they are converted to sugars.

The article also recommends eating foods that are higher in soluble fiber and will help stabilize and regulate blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber also produces higher levels of good “gut’ bacteria and makes you feel fuller, longer. Regular exercise should also be a part of your daily, healthy regime.

Finally, increase your consumption of lean protein. It helps to absorb valuable amino acids that build muscle. Eating the right proteins is critical to the overall effect of your insulin “smart” diet, so pay attention to the types and amounts of the protein you eat.

You may also want to consider some supplementation in your plan, regardless if your goals are weight-loss or simply universal good health. My company has developed a great tasting shake in several different flavors that allow me to easily and conveniently control my blood sugar and insulin levels.

www.getyourleanon.com/blog_home/2016/08/13/5-ways-lower-blood-sugar-and-insulin-levels-naturally-get-your-lean/

Are Suffering From Gluten Intolerance?

Gluten is a widespread name for the proteins that can be usually found in wheat products. Grains that contain gluten include wheat, barley, rye, oats and others. People who eat gluten-loaded foods can feel a plethora of symptoms—often described as allergic reactions that can yield to intestinal inflammations. Problems like an unpleasant feeling in the stomach can easily become long-term damage.

Currently, you can’t be tested for gluten intolerance—but taking the test to rule out celiac disease can help. During normal digestion, enzymes are in charge of breaking down long strands of protein. Gluten amino acids are called peptides and they can be absorbed and transported within the body for later use. Occasionally, the body will treat peptides as foreign bodies and set off alarms, convincing the immune system the body is under attack, which can create  all sorts of health problems and symptoms.

It’s often difficult to note gluten intolerance, because many food items can hide its presence. To find traces of this compound, you have to start reading labels. In that way, you will be fully aware of the elements that are in that item. Watch for food additives, medications, and flavorings. Having knowledge of what you put in your body is crucial for your health.

Here is a list of 15 Indicators that can help you determine if you are gluten intolerant.

  1. Constant headaches. The cause of recurring migraines after finishing your meal can be a big sign that shouldn’t be ignored. The biggest triggers are sugary foods, alcohol, dairy products, artificial sweeteners and processed meats. If you are eating lot of these foods, then there may be your answer. Be aware that everyday products like shampoos, products for cleaning and perfumes can contribute to migraines as well. The American Academy of Neurology hired researchers to do the study in 2001If this is the case, the solution doesn’t necessarily mean medicating yourself. Miracles can happen with just a few everyday changes. Try consuming more vitamins and minerals. Not only will they contribute to the migraines fading away but they can help with your overall health.
  2. Digestive problems. Gluten can affect the stomach and it can be the first organ to indicate something Is off. A study done in 2013 that was published in Gastroenterology Hepatology revealed some interesting facts. Gastrointestinal symptoms can be created by following the consumption of wheat in some people. Those people are usually suffering from celiac disease or allergies. Some of the symptoms are bloating, cramps, constipation, gas or heartburn. 
  3. Extreme exhaustion. Fatigue is a common symptom when we talk about gluten sensitivity. If you find you are extremely lethargic after a meal you may want to take a look at what foods may be triggering this feeling. Too many carbohydrates can give energy spikes that later lead to the feeling of somnolence. Hormonal imbalance due to gluten sensitivity can also yield some big changes to our body.
    Sleep problems like insomnia and struggling with proper brain function can have an impact on fatigue.
  4. Mood swings. We can all be prone to irritability—it’s normal and it happens to all of us. However, extreme anxiety and anger issues can feel awful—leading to a lack of self-control. People with a gluten intolerance have a tendency towards mood swings, feelings of depression and sadness. Two reasons are cited for these emotional rollercoasters: either your body is assaulting its tissues and yielding to inflammation or the gluten is obstructing the absorption of nutrients.
  5. Dermatological problems. One prominent target of gluten allergy-related effects is, of course, the skin—the biggest organ in the human body. It’s no rarity that people allergic to gluten suffer from multiple skin conditions at once. When gluten latches onto the top skin layer, the epidermis cells can get damaged beyond repair—causing rashes, itching, blisters and severe redness. A lack of vitamin A can also manifests itself through acne, psoriasis and several forms of eczema.
  6. Muscle pain due to fibromyalgia. FibromyalgiaFibromyalgia is the collective name for all types of muscle fiber-related chronic pain. It’s somewhat difficult to pinpoint, as it affects both muscle and connective tissue. Due to the prevalence of connective tissue, you may or may not feel pain in your bones too. One recently discovered cause of fibromyalgia just maybe gluten intolerance. During one prominent study, it was discovered that a non-celiac form of gluten sensitivity can be a cause of fibromyalgia. If you have fibromyalgia, you may want to try eliminating gluten-based products.
  7. Dental problems. Enamel is one of four major tissues that form the body of your teeth. Its role is to protect the body from acidic attacks and decay. Several proteins are responsible for its production—Enamelin and amelogenin are a pair of proteins responsible for creating and regenerating enamel tissue.  If you suffer from gluten sensitivity or a gluten allergy, these two proteins will be affected. This will lead to discolorations and problems within the enamel tissue. Because of this, it may become weaker and more sustainable to breakage.
  8. A clouded mind. A condition known as “mental fogginess” is characterized by a severe lack of focus and trouble staying concentrated. It’s a hazardous condition to have, as it can affect your day-to-day life. This cloudiness can indeed be caused by an intolerance to gluten and hinder the normal functionality of your brain and cause it to become less efficient in every way.
  9. A sudden appearance of autoimmune diseases.  When your body experiences gluten sensitivity, you tend to suffer from certain conditions known as autoimmune diseases. They are caused by the body attacking its own cells in a desperate attempt to preserve health and eradicate any presumed threat. There are 80 types of autoimmune diseases. Ones like lupus and multiple sclerosis aren’t surely caused by gluten. However, a person that already has MS or diabetes can see their symptoms worsen due to their gluten intolerance. A simple change in your diet can turn your whole life around in a matter of days.
  10. Frequent miscarriages and an inability to conceive. Everything about child conception and being pregnant is about hormones. There are several disorders which may severely disturb the hormonal system’s balance. One such disorder  isn’t really a disorder, but an intolerance to gluten. One woman went to a nutritionist as her last resort. He suggested that there may be a possibility of gluten intolerance. She laughed it off and tried removing bread and all wheat products from her diet. This instance proved to be the deciding factor in transforming her life. Several studies followed, describing the effect of gluten on human hormones. The results were astonishing.
  11. Unexplained weight gain. One side effect of celiac disease is unexplained weight gain. Weight gain might not be a direct result of gluten intolerance, but a side effect of a malfunctioning gut. As people who are gluten intolerant consume gluten-rich foods, the inner lining of the small intestine becomes inflamed, causing, tiny fissures appear allowing bacteria and other food molecules escape into the bloodstream. These foreign molecules are seen as foreign substances in the bloodstream and the white blood cells start to attack them, causing more inflammation. This makes for the perfect environment to pick up weight. The easiest way to determine if  gluten is the cause of  weight gain is by gradually decreasing or removing gluten from your diet. If your body weight starts to drop, chances are you are gluten intolerant. To be sure, however, you need to reintroduce the gluten-rich foods, one at a time. When you do this, you will be able to see if you gain weight again.
  12. Depression and anxiety. There are certain foods that seem to lift a person’s spirits and others that seem to bring a person down. Gluten can be a depression-inducing food. Only one percent of people in the US have celiac-disease, the most extreme form of gluten intolerance. There are a number of other people who live with non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and these people can experience digestive problems that are related to depression and anxiety. Gluten is also a major allergen that can cause unwanted brain reactions. A study was done 2014 where 22 people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity were given a gluten-free diet for three days. They then received either a gluten-rich, whey rich or a placebo diet to follow for a further three days. The researchers assessed the candidates after the three day period and calculated their depression scores. The candidates who received the gluten diet showed much higher depression scores than the candidates who had either the placebo or the whey diets. This strong correlation pointed towards how gluten could actually make you feel depressed. Another study published in 2007 also showed that people with celiac disease were 80% more likely to suffer from depression than those who were gluten tolerant. The study was performed on 1400 candidates. Furthermore, a Swedish study that was done in 2011, showed that people who had celiac disease also had a higher risk of committing suicide. Although the correlation between gluten and depression might not be a direct correlation, if you suffer from depression, you might want to consider cutting down on the gluten.
  13. Leg and arm numbness. One of the more surprising symptoms of gluten intolerance is peripheral neuropathy. This condition can manifest itself in a number of different ways, including numbness, tingling, burning and in some cases pain of the arms, legs, and feet. When you are gluten intolerant, your body sometimes starts to produce anti-gluten antibodies. When these antibodies attack the gluten, it occasionally also causes nerve damage. A study was done where 215 patients were screened for axonal neuropathy and the results showed that none of the patients had any medical reason for the neuropathy. However, when these candidates were tested to see if they were gluten intolerant, the study showed that 34% had high amounts of anti-gluten antibodies. Surprisingly 80% of all the candidates showed that they had the celiac disease gene. A clear indication that there had to be a connection between the neuropathy and gluten intolerance. According to the University of Chicago, it is actually quite common to show signs of neuropathy and not show any of the other gastrointestinal signs of gluten intolerance. Physicians recommend that you follow a gluten-free diet to alleviate and even remove any sign of neuropathy.
  14. Iron deficiency anemia. Iron is a vital component of hemoglobin (the red pigment) to enable the transport of oxygen. The symptoms that accompany iron deficiency anemia is fatigue, irritability, headaches, brittle nails and a decreased appetite. Celiac disease can cause damage to the small intestine and restrict the absorption of iron. During the early stages of the disease, the upper two parts of the small intestine become damaged—this is where most iron is absorbed. If you have been suffering from chronic anemia and medication has not alleviated the issue, it is recommended that you have yourself tested for celiac disease by your physician.  Once you have been diagnosed with celiac disease and you start with a gluten-free diet, you will notice a change in your energy levels seeing that your intestine begins to heal and absorbs more iron. You need to give the diet between two through eight months to correct the imbalances that occurred.
  15. Canker sores. Canker sores are little lesions or sores that form around the gums, the inside of the cheeks and underneath the tongue. A person can typically have one to six canker sores at a time and they usually last for about 10 days. These pesky little sores are quite common and can be triggered by a number of things. They typically start to form between the ages of 10 and 20 and tend to resolve or fade away during a person’s 30s. These tiny ulcers can be quite painful and irritating, seeing that they are extremely sensitive and make eating a chore rather than a pleasure. When these sores occur repeatedly, the condition is known as Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis, or RAS. Doctors wanted to find out if there was a correlation between gluten and RAS and found 247 patients which were screened with the IgA antibody test, IgA and IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase. Seven random patients that tested positive for at least one of the sets were then sent for further biopsies and the results showed that they had gluten-sensitive enteropathy. These seven patients did not respond to the normal canker sore medication and were, therefore, put on a glutted-free diet for six months. During that time, four out of the seven patients showed a remarkable reduction in canker sores. The researchers concluded that when a person is diagnosed with RAS, he should consult a physician and test for celiac disease.