My work is marketing for a wellness manufacturer that has an online store (only). Over the past 15 years, due to an honest R&D at this company, I have learned so much quality supplements. My stomach cringes when I see someone loading up on inferior supplements off a store shelf (we have tested hundreds and hundreds of these) or a kitchen cabinet that looks like the photo.

I know many supplements on the market are a waste of money and often people spend too much for meagre results. I find I need to share what I know about supplements.

Today, I received this testimony from a happy customer that proves my cringing has merit:
“Pictures are worth a thousand words: left or right? Hashimoto’s, Celiac, Adrenal fatigue and feel SO MUCH better!! Can’t even tell anymore – thanks to the picture on the left. I don’t share a lot of what I do on my personal page but when someone’s overall health is better because of two products… felt the need to share!”
– the products on the left side of the image are from the company I market.

Did you know that human results testing is rare on a finished product?
But our company has them:
Freiburgstudy.com
Sterlingclinicalresults.com
This was a clincher: Freiburgstudy.com/img/Deprivation%20Study.pdf

This is why I take these supplements myself!

Gluten intolerant or glyphosate intolerant?

Celiac disease, and, more generally, gluten intolerance, is a growing problem worldwide, but especially in North America and Europe, where an estimated 5% of the population now suffers from it,” researchers wrote in a meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies.

They propose that glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide, Roundup®, is the most important causal factor in this epidemic. The study, published in the journal Interdisciplinary Toxicology in 2013, was completely ignored by the media except for Mother Earth News and The Healthy Home Economist.

Now that glyphosate is getting the attention it deserves, being named as the culprit in a $280 million cancer lawsuit and labeled as a carcinogen by the World Health Organization and the state of California, it may be time to look at the chemical’s role in a related disease:

The symptoms of so-called “gluten intolerance” and celiac disease are shockingly similar to the symptoms in lab animals exposed to glyphosate. They study’s authors also reference a recent study on how glyphosate affects the digestive systems of fish. It decreased digestive enzymes and bacteria, disrupted mucosal folds, destroyed microvilli structure in the intestinal wall, and increased secretion of mucin — features highly reminiscent of celiac disease.

Additionally, the number of people diagnosed with gluten intolerance and celiac disease has risen in tandem with the increased use of glyphosate in agriculture, especially with the recent practice of drenching grains in the herbicide right before harvest, which started in the 1980s and became routine in the 1990s. While some suggest the recent surge in celiac disease is due simply to better diagnostic tools (which as you can see above happened around 2000), a recent study suggests it’s more than that.

In 2009, researchers looked for gluten antibodies in frozen immune serum obtained between 1948 and 1954 for gluten antibodies, and compared them with samples from people today. They found a 4-fold increase in the incidence of celiac disease in the younger generation. As further evidence the researchers make the following points:

“Celiac disease is associated with imbalances in gut bacteria that can be fully explained by the known effects of glyphosate on gut bacteria.”

“Celiac disease is associated with the impairment of cytochrome P450 enzymes. Glyphosate is known to inhibit cytochrome P450 enzymes.”

“Deficiencies in iron, cobalt, molybdenum, copper and other rare metals associated with celiac disease can be attributed to glyphosate’s strong ability to chelate these elements.”

“Deficiencies in tryptophan, tyrosine, methionine and selenomethionine associated with celiac disease match glyphosate’s known depletion of these amino acids.”

“Celiac disease patients also have a known increased risk for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which has also been implicated in glyphosate exposure.”

“The incidence of non-Hodgkins lymphoma has increased rapidly in most Western countries over the last few decades. Statistics from the American Cancer Society show an 80% increase since the early 1970’s, when glyphosate was first introduced on the market.”

“Reproductive issues associated with celiac disease, such as infertility, miscarriages, and birth defects, can also be explained by glyphosate.”

Glyphosate residues in grain, sugar and other crops are increasing recently likely due to the growing practice of crop desiccation just prior to harvest, the researchers say. The secretive, illegal practice has become routine among conventional farmers since the 1990s. Ironically, the practice increases yields by killing the crops. Just before the plants die, they release their seeds in order to propagate the species.

Moral of the story? We need to go glyphosate-free, not gluten-free. And that means going organic, especially when it comes to grains and animals who eat those grains.

Are you a weekend gardener?

Now that warmer weather is here, I find I spend more time out in my yard and garden. Finding natural and safe products can sometimes be an issue, but I have found some safe and affordable lawn and gardening care alternatives using my everyday household products.

For killing weeds.
I mix 1/4 cup Tough & Tender with 1 gallon vinegar and two cups salt. Apply to trouble spots. For stronger, hardier weeds I add 1/2 Lemon Bright dish soap. The soap is needed to break through the weed’s protective coating.
Here is a “how-to” video: https://youtu.be/tINbAl37hvo

Ridding the lawn of gnats, “no seeums” and mushrooms.
Spray the lawn with a diluted mixture of Tough & Tender in a lawn sprayer unit. It will kill the little gnats as well as mushrooms that grow in your yard. (Tough & Tender is my go-to cleaning product, It’s one thing we are never out of there are so many uses for it!)

Killing “Yard Bugs”.
Mix 1 cup of Lemon Brite dish soap and 1 cup of pre-mixed Breath-Away Mouthwash into a 20 gallon hose-end sprayer and soak your lawn, garden beds and trees to the point that the fluid is running off. Bugs HATE it!

Killing Ants.
Spray concentrated Pre-spot Plus on areas ants congregate (don’t use on wood). For heavier concentrations and black ants, combine 1 ounce of MelaMagic and 1 ounce of Sol-U-Mel in a 16 ounce spray bottle and fill with water.

Armyworm caterpillars.
Mix 1/2 cup of MelaMagic in two gallons of water to spray. Spray cocoon, nest, and any webs you see. This will also help cutdown on succeeding generations as well as with the ant invasion that follows the armyworms.

All purpose home made spray.
A safe and non-toxic bug spray can be made from a combination of ¼ cup of Sol-U-Mel, five drops of T36-C5, 1 teaspoon of Tough & Tender, and 14 ounces of water. Or you can just get the Natural Insect Repellent. (Which we happen to love!)

My favorite snack time treat

Sometimes when I eat something for breakfast, like cereal for instance, I find that around two to three hours later I start feeling peckish and a bit tired, instead of reaching for an ever-ready treat from the office kitchen (you know a donut or candy), I make one of these great GC Control shakes.

Not only do I love them for their taste, but they fill that “hole” and provide a boost in energy, getting me back on track. That’s because they provide me a better balance of protein and carbs that last far longer than a donut or candy bar. The link below explains why this product works so well.

For more about GC Control,
click here.

Self-Care Is Not An Indulgence.

It’s A Discipline.

Compassion and self care is something I’ve been so mindful of lately. We love our families, our pets, our friends and so many other things in life but how often do we love ourselves? The way self-care is portrayed today is completely and utterly backward.

First, self-care as a concept is almost exclusively aimed at women because, after all, women are busy caring of everyone. Unfortunately there is always the underlying suggestion that while women should be taking care of themselves, it doesn’t absolve them from taking care of everyone else.

Secondly, self-care is often characterized as an indulgence. This means both that the practice of self-care is something that is only occasionally allowed and that it should feel like an indulgence.

Self-care is not an indulgence. Self-care is a discipline. It requires tough-mindedness, a deep and personal understanding of your priorities, and a respect for both yourself and the people with whom you choose to spend your life.

If we are being honest, self-care is actually kind of boring. Self-care is a actually a discipline—it takes discipline to continually make “good for you” as opposed to doing what feels good right here, right now. It’s takes discipline to refuse to take on the responsibility for other people’s emotional well-being—and, it takes discipline to take full and complete responsibility for your own well-being.

Samples of self care include:

  • Turning off the TV instead of watching another episode of “The Crown” because the alarm is going off at 5am so you can get to the gym.
  • Declining the second drink at the office holiday party. It might even be declining the first drink.
  • Saying “no” to things you don’t want to do even if it causes someone to be angry with you.
  • Maintaining financial independence.
  • Doing work that matters.
  • Letting others manage their own affairs and take care of themselves.

Think about the oxygen mask on a plane. In case of emergency, you are instructed to put yours on first—before helping family and fellow passengers—so you can better care for others. Life works the same way; when we exercise self-compassion, love, and care, we show up bigger and brighter for ourselves and for others. Self-care is not something that’s done once in awhile when the world gets crazy. It’s what should be done every day, every week, month in and month out. It’s taking care of oneself in a way that doesn’t require “indulging” in order to restore balance. It’s a commitment to stay healthy and balanced as a regular practice.

Time is often cited as an issue for lack of self-care, but self-care and me time can be scheduled it in, just like a meeting, lunch with a friend, or a doctor appointment. Ironically, most people find that when they truly care for themselves—exercising all the discipline that it requires—they are finding they are in a much stronger place to give to those around them. They note they are a fully engaged colleague, a more grateful spouse, and happier parents. Those who take care of themselves find they have the energy to take care of others joyfully because caregiving doesn’t come at their own expense.

Self-compassion is something we all need to do. It’s easy to get wrapped up in self-limiting beliefs and fears—those who take care of themselves also have the energy to work with meaning and purpose toward a worthy goal. Which means they are also the people most likely to make the world a better place for all of us

What forms of self-care do you enjoy?

April 4 is Vitamin C Day

So why do we “celebrate” Vitamin C day on April 4th? Well, according to the American Institute of Nutrition, it goes all the way back to 1932, when Vitamin C was isolated and identified.

The all-important vitamin helps heal wounds, acts as an antioxidant, can help delay or prevent developing  diseases like cancer or cardiovascular disease, and is good for your immune system (to name a few perks).  Citrus fruits, tomatoes, and potatoes are a high source of Vitamin C, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Click here to see other Vitamin C-rich foods.

The NIH suggests that people at different ages or phases of life need different amounts of Vitamin C.  Click here to see the full chart