Early Puberty Mystery Linked to Family Exposure to Household Chemicals

American girls are now going through puberty significantly earlier than in prior decades and this trend has been linked to physiological and psychological risks. Factors thought to drive early puberty include: obesity, toxic stress, and environmental elements.

A recent landmark study focused on one particular type of environmental element — chemicals in household items. A long-running study on mothers and children published in Human Reproduction determined that the onset of female puberty is associated with exposure to commonly used chemicals like phthalates, parabens, and the antibacterial agent triclosan.

These products can be found in personal care products, some brands of perfumes, cosmetics, and toothpaste. The same result was not found in populations of boys, whose timing of puberty was also examined in this study.

University of California, Berkeley associate professor Kim Harley, Ph.D reported that researchers have known for the past 15 to 20 years that girls are entering puberty at an earlier age than they used to in the past. Obesity certainly plays a role in that, but now science has shown that the hormone-disrupting chemicals that are in our homes and in our environment could be an additional factor that’s contributing to this.

While it’s too soon to say conclusively whether these widely used chemicals are definitively causing early puberty, we need to pay attention to these chemicals and studies are starting to have enough information about them to certainly be concerned.

Discovering the cause of early puberty is important to scientists because the phenomenon is linked to a higher risk of developing depression, a greater risk for teen pregnancy, and an increased likelihood of developing diseases like breast cancer and heart disease.

The new study’s conclusions are based on data on pregnant women and the children they gave birth to who were enrolled in the Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas study between 1999 and 2000. When the women were at around 14 and 27 weeks’ gestation they gave the scientists consent to examine their urine samples for concentrations of phthalates, parabens, and phenols.

After the women gave birth, the team collected urine samples and evaluated the pubertal development of the resulting 179 girls and 159 boys. Every nine months between the ages of 9 and 13, scientists checked in to see how puberty was affecting the children. Overall, 90 percent of the urine samples showed concentrations of all the tested compounds. That was only detected in the 73 percent of the samples of pregnant mothers and 69 percent of samples taken from the nine-year old girls.

Mothers whose samples contained diethyl phthalate and triclosan had daughters that entered puberty earlier. For every doubling of triclosan in the mother’s urine, the timing of the girls’ first menstrual period shifted by just under a month and for every doubling in the samples for an indicator for phthalates, the development of girls’ pubic hair shifted by 1.3 months earlier. The urine samples taken from 9-year old girls revealed that, for every doubling in concentrations of parabens, the timing of the breast and pubic hair development, as well as their first period, happened one month earlier on average.

One reason these chemicals may affect puberty is because all of them are known endocrine disruptors. Previous studies on animals and humans have demonstrated that endocrine disruptors have the capacity to mimic, block, or otherwise interfere with the body’s hormones. They can bind to hormone receptors, such as estrogen receptors, and influence changes in our bodies. These chemicals can impact development, particularly if the exposure is happening in utero, and t research from human studies show that they may also impact development.

The difficulty in sharing the study’s results is that for now all they can say is that these are “chemicals of concern.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention readily acknowledges that there’s widespread exposure to phthalates and parabens, with the majority of Americans who are tested containing evidence of these chemicals in their urine. However, the agency states that finding a measurable amount of these chemicals does “not imply that they cause an adverse health effect.”

Harley hopes that regulators look at studies like hers when they move forward in conducting policy decisions and regulations. As of now, she explains, there’s no established benchmark level that states when it’s no longer safe to be exposed to these chemicals. It’s not illegal to have them in personal care products because the science isn’t strong enough to say that they absolutely cause adverse health effects. They are controversial chemicals, and about 70 percent of Americans have them inside their bodies.

These chemicals are basically ubiquitous. Regulation isn’t really there, but for people who are concerned, there are things that can be done. The advice is simple: Reduce exposure to chemicals of concern by changing the personal care products that you use and by purchasing products that don’t contain them.

So if you’re like me and pay attention to labels and ingredients, you may be concerned about the health and well being of your families, and arre careful about what you bring into your home. Switching to products that are formulated with natural, biodegradable ingredients and contain no harsh chemicals means they’re safer for your children, family, your home, and the environment.

National Clean off Your Desk Day

The second Monday in January is National Clean Off Your Desk Day. Since studies now show that clutter causes stress and anxiety this day is an opportunity to begin the new year with a clean and organized workspace as well as reduced stress.

Whether your desk is in a private or shared office, cubicle, home or a make-shift desk on the counter, having your workspace uncluttered, organized, refreshed and clean will help you work more efficiently and give you a sense of serenity.

I know I’ll be in my office cleaning my desk and entire office to brighten my new year. How about you?

Testing smoke detectors

Every year, on December first, we do a smoke detector check.  We know it’s a good idea to check your smoke detectors regularly, and we do it before we start decorating for the holidays.

It’s easy, all I do is reach up (I have high ceilings so I need the ladder) and push the button to make sure each smoke detector beeps to check the alarm capability. Then to really test it, I light two or three matches, blow them out and hold them under the detector so the smoke drifts toward it. If that doesn’t set it off, the smoke detector isn’t working. and the matches are a lot easier to test with than burning something on the stove!

It’s a great way to make certain all is safe for the holidays!

Safer, cleaner homes

Did you know that every 13 seconds a family calls a poison control center?

Like most people, you want a clean home. Yet, every day over 300 children in the United States require emergency medical care due to accidental poisonings by household items.

You’re busy, and on a budget, so you need cleaning products that bust through grime without busting your bank account. You want a safe home, but caustic chemicals like chlorine bleach around the house can be hazardous. Many  cleaning products are so harsh they can’t come in direct contact with your skin. they need to be stored high, out of reach of children, and they come with safety caps and warnings if accidentally ingested. Yet you are expected to slather them on your counter tops, sinks and floors. 

Harsh chemicals aren’t just hard on your skin, they’re also hard on your home and our planet. They contaminate water supplies, leach into the soil and have to be stored as hazardous waste. 

Cleaning your home shouldn’t involve putting your family at risk.
The first step is to educate yourself as a consumer, the next step is to eliminate toxins from your daily life.  Like they say, an educated consumer always makes smarter choices.

That’s why I decided to avoid the caustic chemicals and abrasives that are contained in so many cleaners. I was tired of seeing reddened hands and rashes every time I cleaned the house—not to mention th sneezing, coughing, wheezing and asthma attacks. It seemed that not only was I reacting to dust, I was reacting to the cleaning products!

I found a great group of American-made products with formulas  sourced from natural ingredients that won’t leave behind dangerous chemicals and poisons. All of my new products are free of chlorine bleach, ammonia, formaldehyde, phosphates, phthalates and other harsh chemicals. The best part? My side-effects from cleaning disappeared! Plus, I get the best of both worlds: effective cleaning, stain-lifting, deodorizing and disinfecting power without the danger of harsh chemicals. They also require NO child-safety caps!

Another bonus I discovered was my new brand  also reduces my impact on the environment with biodegradable ingredients and ultra-concentrated formulas. The smaller bottles result in less plastic, water and fuel waste, while still giving me potent cleaning power that lasts longer than grocery store brands.

With all these benefits, you might expect that I’m paying premium-prices. Instead, these products save me money. Their concentrated formulas offer more cleaning power at less cost per use than many national brands. So, I get better quality at a better price. But that’s not all. Get this, my laundry products can also cut more than $10 a month from my power bill! Heating water for laundry uses 90% more energy than washing in cold water, and these products are specifically formulated to get my laundry clean in cold water.

That’s another reason why I switched to products that are better for me, my family, my home and budget and, of course, they work. So I can spend less time, stress and money on daily chores, and do more of the things that really matter. Now I never compromise clean for safe.

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Something to think about

Next time you go to the store to buy ANY kind of cleaning product (including laundry detergents), here’s something to think about:
Why don’t big time manufacturers fully disclose the “other ingredients” NOT listed on their labels?
Have you noticed fine print that reads: “Precautionary statement: Hazards to humans and domestic animals” (as shown on this Mr. Clean label)?
Have you thought about what sort of hazards do they mean? It’s not specific.
Have you questioned how is this product could affect you and your family’s health over time? Are you really okay with this?
An informed consumer makes better, wiser choices…it doesn’t have to be complicated!
We can help you make better choices.

ADVANTAGES OF CLEAN FLOORS

It goes without saying that clean floors make your home LOOK better, so that is a key reason why you clean your floors. Surprisingly, another big reason is to prevent injuries from tripping or slipping.

We have included a posting from “Wikipedia” to inform you of some others as well as best practices in floor-cleaning and the care of a variety of surfaces including wood, tile, carpet, and vinyl.

Returning to reasons, aside from beautifying your floors, the correct methods can remove stains, as well as surface dirt. Proper cleaning actually increases the life of your floors. Cleaning your floors the right way can kill allergens that can cause or exacerbate diseases like asthma.

Regular maintenance can help you avoid expensive professional cleaning or machine rentals or purchases. Household budgets are sensitive these days, so avoiding these expenses can obviously help.

The company with whom I am associated has recently developed a complete system for cleaning, dusting and polishing your floors easily and efficiently. Another advantage of proper cleaning is that cleaning your floors can burn 200 calories and the results will help you feel psychologically better. So, get to work. Your home will look good and you will feel good.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floor_cleaning#Reasons_for_cleaning_floors

It’s never been more clear: Spraying a toxic chemical around your house is breathtakingly dangerous!

If you’re using Windex® Original Glass Cleaner in your home, that’s exactly what you’re doing. Ammonia is a known toxin that doesn’t belong in any home. But many folks who wouldn’t dream of bringing ammonia into their home use Windex Original Glass Cleaner without a second thought—and yet, Windex is powered by ammonia!

As Windex cleans, inadvertent spray enters and irritates your respiratory system and eyes. Fumes fill the room you’re cleaning. Skin contact is warned against, but as you mist the product into the air, how can you help some of it settling on your skin?
If it gets on your hair, you continue the exposure until you wash your hair again. Imagine your hair getting it on your pillowcase and you breathing it in all night long!

Does all this really matter?

YES—more than we ever knew before. A recent study based on 20 years of research reveals a shocking truth: Cleaning your home with common, well-known grocery store brand cleaning products like Windex Original Glass Cleaner as little as once per week over time is as damaging to respiratory health as smoking a pack of cigarettes a day for 20 years!

You would never give your children cigarettes to smoke, so don’t give them ammonia to breathe.

My company launched and led the green movement to replace toxic cleaners with safer ingredients, and our glass and window cleaner is one of those highly effective and much safer products. This product will give you the sparkling windows, mirrors, fixtures, appliances,
stainless steel, and aluminum you want without any of the unhealthy side effects you don’t. It cuts through everything from grimy fingerprints to toothpaste, and breaks up and washes away more dirt and smudges—all without ammonia.

Instead, our product is powered by 99% biodegradable cleaning agents and contains absolutely no ammonia, chlorine bleach, formaldehyde or toxic chemicals of any kind. It’s so safe, no childproof cap is required! A gleaming, streak-free shine is all that is left behind.

Warning! All but two Windex Glass and Multi-Purpose Cleaners contain ammonia, so go through your house and garage, and dispose of them responsibly, then replace them with a glass-and-more cleaner that will take better care of your home, your family’s health, and our precious environment.

What you should know if you use bleach

I don’t know about you, but I really am not a fan of those bleach commercials. You know, the ones where they tell you that to get something clean, you need to use bleach. Otherwise, you’re not cleaning properly, because bleach is the only thing can can get your house clean, fresh and bacteria free.

Common household bleach (sodium hydroxide) can be found in a variety of household products in both liquid and granular form and is not, technically speaking, considered corrosive or toxic, even if ingested. However, bleach exposure  is highly irritating and corrosive to the eyes, mouth and lungs. Fumes from bleach are very potent, as you can tell by the smell, and when inhaled can cause nervous system and brain damage, individuals with asthma or other breathing problems are particularly susceptible. In fact, inhaling the fumes is potentially carcinogenic.

Dermal contact of bleach can cause rash and burning. The longer the bleach is left on your skin,  the more likely it is that you will begin to experience burning, itching and other types of irritation. If the bleach is left on your skin for an inordinately long period of time, it can cause pigment lightening and permanent tissue damage.

Serious side effects of using bleach can include respiratory problems, skin burns, damage to the nervous system, asthma flares, extreme headaches, migraines, and vomiting. Inhalation of chlorine gas or drinking highly concentrated sources of chlorine (such as household bleach) can lead to vomiting, coma, and even death.

Athough it is not considered “technically toxic” stories abound concerning bleach and the side effects.

From the “Pharmaceutical Press”: A young girl had suffered episodes of vomiting, abdominal pain, and bronchopneumonia over a period of a year which was finally traced to her habit of sucking socks that had been bleached.

From Clinical Toxicology of Commercial Products:  An 18 month old girl who swallowed a “few tablespoons” of liquid household bleach coughed, choked and vomited. Promptly thereafter she became lethargic and was admitted to a local hospital in a state of coma. Death occurred 19 hours after ingestion.

Why would you add a half cup of chemical toxins to your load of laundry?
Well, that’s what you’re doing when you add Clorox® Bleach to your wash. The culprit in Clorox Bleach is chlorine—that toxic chemical with vapors irritating to your eyes and damaging to your respiratory system. Products with the word bleach in its name obviously contain bleach, however; a variety of products contain bleach and it may not be obvious at first glance, or smell. Some examples are: Drano, Tilex, Palmolive, and Cascade.

The statistics are startling.

An estimated 61% of toilet bowl cleaners use chlorine bleach. Another 26% of adults use chlorine bleach directly in their toilets. That means 87% of all toilets are being cleaned with a known poison that is then flushed into city water systems. That water must then be treated with more chemicals before being released into our water ways.

Not only can bleach be toxic, but it can increase my risk of an asthma attack and make the condition worse, as well as lead to COPD or cancer. I admit it, I was an ardent user of bleach until I decided to spend time reading labels and go green 15 years ago when I discovered a manufacturer providing greener products through an online shopping club.

I now use an EPA-registered botanical disinfectant, powered by thyme oil and citric acid, which kills over 99.9% of common household germs—no caustic chlorine bleach or quats required. I admit disinfecting my home has never been easier! For toilets, there’s an alternative powered by organic cleaners and thyme oil that has the same environmental impact as
a bowl of lemons. It cleans beautifully, and smells great. I found a great way to get my home even cleaner than using bleach and my cleansers smell so much better! I know my home is safer too.

The link to the article below offers alternatives to using bleach in your laundry:
https://www.melaleucajournal.com/time-break-bleach-move-melabrite-plus-oxi/

Switching stores and switching from bleach allowed me to get rid of a lot more than just the stains and dirt, it got rid of Ammonia; Chlorine Bleach; Petroleum Distillates; Gloves; Toxic Ingredients; no special ventilation is required and I have NO WORRIES!

It’s time to talk about dishwashing

I want to share something I learned a long time ago— you know it’s prohibited to vent your automatic dishwasher outdoors. Most dishwashers will have a vent on the outside of the door, others (like mine) will have a concealed vent located on the inside of the door, but both went the hot steam/air into your kitchen.

Why?

Because it’s prohibited to have chlorine gases emitted into the environment. Consider this, when you use an automatic dishwashing detergent that contains chlorine bleach, or other name-brand product containing a bleach chemical, it combines with the heat and steam which creates chlorine gas.

Since it’s not released outdoors, but released into our homes through the machines vents it creates an unhealthy or even toxic indoor air quality. That’s why it’s recommended to open your windows regularly to circulate air. If you don’t, those chlorine-based outgases can stay in your home for up to seven days! How unhealthy is that? No wonder so many children today suffer from asthma and other lung-related issues.

I stopped using those bleach-based toxic automatic dish soaps years ago.

I am so glad  I switched to a product that is free of phosphates and chlorine bleach. It’s also made with 100% nontoxic ingredients—because what’s on your dishes can also go into your body. The product also comes highly concentrated so the new resealable pouch uses 90% less plastic than the previous bottle, which was already significantly smaller than the competition!

It uses naturally derived water-softening agent naturally derived enzymes and all natural melaleuca oil. No bleach. No phosphates. No poisons. I love having sparkling dishes without endangering my family, and without polluting my home or the environment!

I like shopping with my online shopping club. Not only are the products non-toxic and the best of natural ingredients and science combined, but because I save so much money!

Recently, I placed my online shopping order and received two packages of this fabulous Automatic Dishwashing product FREE with my loyalty shopping dollars, saving me $14.33. Each time I shop, I get loyalty rewards, up to 18% back! I’ve yet to find another store that offers this type of reward, Even after 15 years of shopping with this club, I still get excited each time I order because of the savings!

Can you say that about your store?